Pronunciation:Scottish Terrier

Description

The Scottish Terrier is a sturdy little dog with short legs and the way they are groomed can make them look even shorter. The head is long in proportion to the rest of the dog. The skull is long, slightly domed and medium in width. The almond shaped eyes are small, set well apart. The erect, pointed ears are picked, set well up on the head. The muzzle
r is about the same length as the skull with a small stop, tapering slightly to the nose. Teeth meet in a scissors or level bite. The topline of the back is level. The tail is thicker at the base, medium in length and covered with short, hard hair, carried straight or slightly curved. The front feet are larger than the back feet and round in shape. Dewclaws may be removed. The compact, course, wiry coat is as hard as bristles with a soft protective undercoat. The coat has a distinctive profile with longer hair on the beard, eyebrows, legs and lower part of the body. Colors come in black, wheaten, or brindle. There may be a little bit of white on the chest.

Temperament

Brave and alert, the Scottie is hardy and lovable. They are charming and full of character. Playful and friendly as a puppy, he matures into a dignified adult. The Scottish Terrier makes a very good watchdog. It is inclined to be stubborn, however, and needs firm, but gentle handling from an early age or it will dominate the household. Socialize well. This breed is sensitive to correction, therefore if you are firm and confident, the dog should respond to you. However, if you do not mean it when you tell him, "No" he will know it, and will not listen. Obedience training must be consistent but persuasive. Never hit a dog and do not play aggressive games with a terrier such as the Scottie, like wrestling and tug-of-war. He can challenge family members who have not established leadership over him. Lively, proud, and intelligent, it has a reliable temperament. Likes to dig, enjoys walks, loves to play ball games, and is thoroughly sporty, home loving and independent. It has been described as the dog that can go anywhere and do anything - a big dog in a small dog's body. It is very sensitive to criticism and praise and therefore should be trained gently. These dogs make good house pets. Do not allow this dog to developed Small Dog Syndrome, human induced behaviors where the dog believes he is pack leader to humans. This will cause varying degrees of behavior issues including, but not limited to, moody, snappish, stubborn, protectiveness and obsessive barking. These are not Scottie traits, but traits brought on by the way the human treats the dog. Children need to be taught how to display leadership over the dog or the dog will not be good with them. They are usually not recommended for homes with younger children simply because most owners do not display enough authority over them, and the dogs take over the home. All of the negative behaviors can be reversed if the human changes the way they deal with the dog. The dog needs to clearly know the rules of the home. They need all members of the family to be firm, confident, and consistent in their approach. The dogs need to be provided with a daily pack walk to reinforce leadership and burn both mental and physical energy.

Height, weight

Height: 10-11 inches (25-28 kg.)
Weight: 19-23 pounds (8½-10½kg.)

​Health Problems

Some are prone to Scottie Cramp (a movement problem), Von Willebrand's disease, flea allergy, skin, and jaw problems. These dogs are difficult welpers.
Living Conditions

This dog is good for apartment living. It is moderately active indoors and will do okay without a yard. Prefers cool climates.
Exercise

These are active little dogs, who need a daily walk. Play will take care of a lot of their exercise needs, however, as with all breeds, play will not fulfill their primal instinct to walk. Dogs who do not get to go on daily walks are more likely to display behavior problems. They will also enjoy a good romp in a safe open area off lead, such as a large fenced in yard.
Life Expectancy

About 12-15 years.
Grooming

Regular brushing of the harsh wiry coat is important and extra care should be taken when the dog is shedding. Bathe or dry shampoo as necessary. The dog should be professionally trimmed twice a year. The hair on the body is left long, like a skirt, while the hair on the face is lightly trimmed and brushed forward. This breed sheds little to no hair.
Origin

The Scottish Terrier was developed in Scotland in the 1700s. The breed was first called the Aberdeen Terrier, after the Scottish town of Aberdeen. George, the fourth Earl of Dumbarton nicknamed the dogs "little diehard" in the 19th century. Scotties first arrived in the USA in the 1890's. Scotties were used to hunt den animals, such as rabbit, otter, fox, and badger. The Scottish Terrier was recognized by the AKC in 1885.

Group

Terrier, AKC Terrier
Recognition

CKC, FCI, AKC, UKC, KCGB, CKC, ANKC, NKC, NZKC, CET, CCR, APRI, ACR, DRA, NAPR





Pronunciation   Miniature SCHNOW-zer

    ​Description
The Miniature Schnauzer is a small, sturdily built, little dog. The body is square in proportion. The strong head is rectangular in shape. The width of the head gets slightly smaller from the years to the eyes. The muzzle is strong and ends rather bluntly. The nose is black. The bite is scissors. The deep-set, small eyes are dark brown in color. Ears set high on the head are often cropped to a point. When the ears are left natural they are small and V-shaped folding close to the head. The front legs are straight. The docked tail is set high and carried erect. The tail is cropped just long enough so that it can be seen over the backline of the dog. Note: it is illegal to crop or dock a dogs ears or tail in most parts of Europe. The Mini Schnauzer has a double coat. The outer coat is wiry and the undercoat is soft. The coat is clipped so it has a bushy beard, mustache and eyebrows. Coat colors include black, white, salt and pepper, and black and silver.

Temperament

The Miniature Schnauzer is an intelligent, loving, happy dog. They are energetic, playful and get along well with children and like to be with their people. Affectionate, keen, devoted and docile. With proper leadership they can get along with other dogs. Socialize this breed well. They make good companions and family pets. The Mini Schnauzer will not listen if they sense they are stronger minded than their owner. Owners need to be calm, but firm, possessing a natural air of authority. They do not have a yappy bark, but rather sounds like a low, carried-out howl of a voice. This breed makes a good watchdog and vermin hunter. An easy dog to travel with. Some can be reserved with strangers if the humans do not provide stability in their lives, but most love everyone. Socialize them well. Do not allow this little dog to developed Small Dog Syndrome, human induced behaviors where the dog runs the home. This can cause a varying degree of behavior problems, including, but not limited to separation anxiety, willful, nervous, barky, guarding, bold, sometimes temperamental, not hesitating to attack much bigger dogs. A well balanced dog, who gets enough mental and physical exercise will have a totally different personality. These are not Miniature Schnauzer traits, but rather behaviors brought on by the way the dog is treated by the people around them. It is all up to the humans. As soon as the humans start being true pack leaders, the dogs behavior will change for the better.

Height, Weight

Height: 12-14 inches (30-36cm.)
Weight: 10-15 pounds (5-7kg)

Health Problems

Prone to liver disease, kidney stones, diabetes, skin disorders, von Willebrand's disease and cysts. Also hereditary eye problems. Gains weight easily, do not over feed.
Living Conditions

The Miniature Schnauzer is a good dog for apartment life and will be calm indoors so long as they get enough exercise.
Exercise
These energetic little dogs need daily, long, brisk, walks or jogs, and love play sessions off the leash. While out on the walk the dog must be made to heel beside or behind the person holding the lead, as in a dog's mind the leader leads the way, and that leader needs to be the human. Dogs who do not get to go on daily walks are more likely to display behavior problems. Teach them to enter and exit door and gateways after the humans.

Life Expectancy

About 15 years. It shows no signs of age until quite late in life.
Grooming

The wiry coat is not hard to groom, although it does need attention. Comb and brush daily with a short wire brush to prevent matting. If any appear they should be cut out. They should be clipped all over to an even length twice a year, in spring and fall. Trim around the eyes and ears with blunt-nosed scissors and clean the whiskers after meals. On pet dogs the coat is usually clipped short on the upper body and left somewhat longer on the under-parts, legs and head. Show dogs need to be hand stripped and trimmed instead of clipping. This breed sheds little to no hair and is a good dog for allergy sufferers.

Origin

The Miniature Schnauzer is a German breed. During the years around the turn of the century, both smooth German Pinscher and coarse-haired Schnauzer pups appeared in the same litters. The German Pinscher Schnauzer Club initiated a policy requiring proof of three generations of pure coarse-haired Schnauzer coats for registration. This quickly helped set type and made them a distinct breed from the German Pinscher. These Schnauzers were given the name Standard Schnauzer. Miniature Schnauzers were developed by crossing small Standard Schnauzers, with the Affenpinscher and possibly the Poodle. The Schnauzer name derived from the German word "Schnauze", which means "muzzle". It was used as a ratter and still retains the ability, but is mostly a companion dog today. Some of the Schnauzer's talents include: hunting, tracking, ratter, watchdog, competitive obedience, and performing tricks.

Group

Terrier, AKC Terrier
Recognition
CKC, FCI, AKC, UKC, KCGB, CKC, ANKC, NKC, NZKC, APRI, ACR, DRA, NAPR

HOUSEBREAKING YOUR PUPPY


You purchased wall-to-wall champagne-colored carpet in April. Then, you welcomed a six-week-old Mini Schnauzer or Scottish Terrier named "Strawberry" into your home in May. Follow our simple Housebreaking Program and we'll make sure you're still married in June. With hard work and discipline, all three of you will be celebrating soon enough. Champagne and Strawberries really do go together. We promise.

Go, Baby, Go — Outside: Housebreaking Basics
Like people, puppies do best when they consistently receive clear expectations and are rewarded for good behaviour. Here are some general guidelines to get you started:

It is up to you to set clear, consistent rules your pup can follow. Do this by choosing a general potty location, but realize a puppy probably can't tell the difference between piddling on pinecones and petunias. Note that once she "initiates" a chosen space, she'll use the odor from the first visit as a clue to tell her where to go in the future.

Then, pick a key word or phrase like "Strawberry, do your business," and repeat it each and every time she is expected to pee or poop. This way, she knows what you want her to do. (In a perfect world, you would utter the command and she'd go instantly. Dog trainers call this trick "vocal command elimination." It is an ideal situation, but don't expect it quite yet.).

Make a huge deal of successes, clapping, cheering, even rewarding her with a treat on occasion to let her know she's done a good job. Eventually, she'll connect her actions to the praise and, wanting more praise, she will repeat the action.

Timing is Everything: Frequent Elimination is Necessary
The bladder of a six- to eight-week-old puppy needs to be emptied every one to three hours; older animals can wait a little bit longer between outings. Consider using potty time to bookend the activities in your puppy's day. For example, take her outside after the following events:

Waking in the morning
Napping
Eating
Playing or training
Being left alone
Prior to bedtime

What Goes In Must Come Out: Scheduling Your Pup
Lucky for you, puppies' bodies fall into a routine pretty quickly. You can make their natural biorhythms even more predictable by setting regular mealtimes and affording frequent potty breaks. Note that most are up for a "sniff of air" about an hour after feeding. Thus, by making an educated guess as to when your girl has to go, you can significantly limit the number of accidents inside. For further predictability, consider setting a schedule for you pet that includes:

Mealtimes when you are home to let her out of the house
Limiting meals to 30 or 40 minutes to ensure that food and water are consumed prior to potty time
Completing the final feeding before she's confined for the night

There's No Place Like Home: Considering Crate Training
There will come a time when you've got to leave your puppy alone, your prized book collection just out of reach. (Or so you think.) If you don't want to risk it, you might consider crate training — requiring your pet to stay within her kennel - while you're out (or out of sight). Many puppies eventually find such mandates reassuring and view their kennels as cozy niches, safe havens from the world. (No, we haven't actually polled any puppies on the matter, but we know this is true from observing them.) The idea is to keep her confined safely while maintaining the rule about pooping and peeing outside your home. Here's how to do it:

Begin at mealtime, making a game of tossing kibble pieces into the kennel. This ensures she has a positive experience with her crate

Move toys into the forum, even hide a biscuit, to make the place fun

Once she's comfortable with the space, lock her in, but stay nearby reading or listening to music, talking to her in soothing tones. You don't want her to feel as though she's being punished

Slowly extend the amount of time she spends kenneled to meet your needs, but never ask her to stay in it for longer than she can hold her bladder or bowels

If you must keep your pup in the crate for extended periods, provide her ample room to do her business in the kennel, but ensure the space she is expected to soil is adjacent — not on top of — her resting place. (Most puppies do fine with a 15- to 30-square foot kennel.)

The Trickle That Makes You Prickle: Nervous Peeing and Your Puppy
In the world of dogs, there is a specific order of power. And though you don't have four legs, you will be in the role of alpha dog (provided your pup is well trained, that is). She should be submissive, in that she follows your rules. But for some youngsters, submissive behavior might mean wetting when they first see you. Don't scold your pet, as punishment makes the scenario worse. There are two options:

Teach your puppy to sit down when greeting people by rewarding her with a treat when she does so;

Line your hallway with newspaper and wait it out. Most puppies outgrow the problem.

No Puppy is Perfect: Expect Some Mistakes
Puppies are not considered fully housebroken until they've gone at least four consecutive weeks without eliminating in the house. And, yes, you can expect a few accidents. Remember this is a new skill for your pet and it takes time and patience to develop routines. Until you're in the clear, try the following strategies to minimize messes:

Keep your little one within eyesight at all times
Prop up baby gates to control your pet's movements
Kennel your pup when she's unsupervised

Become a Cleaning Machine: Take Care of That Carpet
If your puppy does pee or poop on the floor, it is imperative you thoroughly remove any potty odors. If the scent lingers, your pet will continue to return to the area to mark her territory. Remember to:

Use a commercial product specifically designed for doggy smells
Saturate any contaminated area with the product
Keep your puppy out of any rooms where continual accidents occur

Being the Heavy: How to Discipline While Housebreaking
Be ready with disciplinary strategies before your pup has an accident. Remember, this is tough work for her, so be gentle in your reprimand. A nasty voice may scare her into thinking she shouldn't void in front of you, even outside. Instead, try this:

If you catch her in the act, provide a startling distraction like stomping your foot or saying "No!" loudly. Then, correct the behavior by taking her immediately outside to her potty place. If she continues to go, praise her effusively;

Scold your pet only once, then drop it. There will be plenty of other opportunities to practice;

Despite the old cliché, never rub a puppy's nose in her own waste. This will serve only to scare her. Besides, it is simply unkind.

Keep On Trying: Your Puppy Will Succeed!
Yes, the process of housebreaking your puppy will try your patience. But know the majority of pups get the idea pretty fast, providing you offer them consistent rules and praise. While you're waiting, remind yourself that housebreaking is a skill, like reading and writing, which demands the alignment of both mind and body. If all else fails remember this: Puppies are ultimately irresistible and you won't be able to stay angry for long.
Feeding Your Puppy

If you’re responsible for taking care of puppies in the first few months of their lives, you need to be prepared to move them from a diet of mom’s milk to regular puppy food. Our ASPCA nutrition experts tell you when and how it’s done, along with some other important info, in these easy top ten tips:
Mother Knows Best Newborn puppies receive complete nutrition from their mother’s milk for the first four weeks of life. Mom's milk is 100 percent perfect for their needs, so there is no need to feed them anything else.

Substitutions Allowed
In the event that the mother dog is ill or doesn’t produce enough milk—or if the pups are found as orphans—it may be necessary to feed a commercial milk replacer. If you find yourself in this situation, contact your veterinarian for product and feeding recommendations.

Love at First Bite
Puppies generally begin eating puppy food around three or four weeks of age. Start with small quantities, and gradually increase the amount of puppy food.

Tasteful Toys
Puppies often play with their food when it is first introduced, but they will quickly learn what to do with it! By the time the pups are completely weaned at seven to eight weeks old, they should be eating their dry food consistently.

Hey Ma, What’s for Dinner?
Puppies require up to twice the energy intake of adults and, depending on the breed, will need to be fed a food that contains 25- to 30-percent protein.

Small Breed Needs
Small breeds of dogs—those weigh 20 pounds or less at maturity—reach mature body weight in nine to twelve months. As puppies, they can be fed free-choice. When food is readily available, most small-breed dogs will develop good eating habits and not become overweight. However, if you have other pets, you should probably feed your small-breed dog by the portion control method.

No Such Thing as a Free Lunch
Most medium-breed puppies (adult size between 20 and 50 pounds) and all large- or giant-breed pups (more than 50 pounds as adults) are best fed with the portion-control method.

Growth Spurts Can Hurt
If they are allowed to overeat, they can consume too many calories, grow too rapidly and develop bone growth problems. Clinical signs often seen with bone growth disease include bowing of the front legs. Sometimes, these signs are misdiagnosed as calcium deficiency (also known as rickets). Radiographs are crucial for an accurate diagnosis.

Easy Does It
Do not overfeed in an attempt to accelerate a puppy’s growth rate. Remember, the adult size of a dog is determined genetically—not by how fast the animal grows. Controlled feeding of a balanced diet specifically made for large- and giant-breed puppies facilitates optimal skeletal development. It is important to aim for a slower rate of growth with large and giant breed puppies.

Treats for Your Sweets
It is okay to feed your puppy treats. However, treats should make up no more than five percent of your puppy’s daily nutrient intake. The rest of his or her diet should come from a high-quality puppy food.

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Age Vaccination
5 weeks Parvovirus: for puppies at high risk of exposure to parvo, some veterinarians recommend vaccinating at 5 weeks. Check with your veterinarian.
6 & 9 weeks Combination vaccine* without leptospirosis.
Coronavirus: where coronavirus is a concern.
12 weeks or older Rabies: Given by your local veterinarian (age at vaccination may vary according to local law).
12 & 15 weeks** Combination vaccine
Leptospirosis: include leptospirosis in the combination vaccine where leptospirosis is a concern, or if traveling to an area where it occurs.
Coronavirus: where coronavirus is a concern.
Lyme: where Lyme disease is a concern or if traveling to an area where it occurs.
Adult (boosters)§ Combination vaccine
Leptospirosis: include leptospirosis in the combination vaccine where leptospirosis is a concern, or if traveling to an area where it occurs.
Coronavirus: where coronavirus is a concern.
Lyme: where Lyme disease is a concern or if traveling to an area where it occurs.
Rabies: Given by your local veterinarian (time interval between vaccinations may vary according to local law).
*A combination vaccine, often called a 5-way vaccine, usually includes adenovirus cough and hepatitis, distemper, parainfluenza, and parvovirus. Some combination vaccines may also include leptospirosis (7-way vaccines) and/or coronavirus. The inclusion of either canine adenovirus-1 or adenovirus-2 in a vaccine will protect against both adenovirus cough and hepatitis; adenovirus-2 is highly preferred.
**Some puppies may need additional vaccinations against parvovirus after 15 weeks of age. Consult with your local veterinarian.

§ According to the American Veterinary Medical Association, dogs at low risk of disease exposure may not need to be boostered yearly for most diseases. Consult with your local veterinarian to determine the appropriate vaccination schedule for your dog. Remember, recommendations vary depending on the age, breed, and health status of the dog, the potential of the dog to be exposed to the disease, the type of vaccine, whether the dog is used for breeding, and the geographical area where the dog lives or may visit.

Bordetella and parainfluenza: For complete canine cough protection, we recommend Intra-Trac II ADT. For dogs that are shown, in field trials, or are boarded, we recommend vaccination every six months with Intra-Trac II ADT.
Dog Vaccination Schedule

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1. The dog should be groomed every 6-8 weeks.

2. The furnishings (beard and leg hair) must be thoroughly combed at least every other day. Never comb just the outer hair, but get all the way down to the skin.

3. At least every two weeks (preferably weekly) your dog's legs and beard should be shampooed. A hair dryer works best to fluff dry. Combing should be done both before and after bathing to prevent matting.

4. Nails should be trimmed every week to ten days--just a sliver can be taken off. They should never touch the floor when the dog is standing nor should you hear the nails click on the floor when the dogs walks.

5. Hair must be pulled out of the ears to prevent ear infections. Just puff an antibiotic ear powder onto the hair and pull hair out with your fingers. Rubber office fingers help grasp the hair more easily.

6. Hair between the pads should be trimmed regularly. The hair should not stick out from pads--it should be level with them. This will help prevent splayed feet and matting between the pads.

7. The matter from your dog's eyes can be cleaned out almost daily so as not to leave a stain or acquire any build-up.

8. Twice a year your veterinarian can clean your dog's teeth to prevent gum infections, tooth decay, and/or bad breath (unless you brush your pet's teeth daily or learn how to scale teeth yourself).

9. When working on your dog, ALWAYS put him/her on a table, bench, or something elevated so he knows you mean business. A bath mat is a good non-skid surface for your dog to stand on. Only quit combing, etc., WHEN YOU ARE DONE and not when your pet thinks you should be through.

10. The breeder can teach you how to do most of the above procedures.
CARE OF YOUR SCHNAUZER BETWEEN GROOMINGS
www.JustDogBreeds.com
Low Shedding
Dog Breeds


This is a list of low shedding dog breeds. These breeds shed virtually no hair at all. If you own one of these low shedding dogs you'll be hard-pressed to find a hair in your home. You won't have to constantly vacuum hair like you do with other breeds. You also won't have to brush your dog each day to remove hair so that it doesn't fall out around the home, like you do with high shedding breeds. So these low shedders are less work!

What about dogs that don't shed at all? Dogs that don't shed don't exist. The fact is all dogs shed at least a little. And because these low shedders shed such little amounts people sometimes incorrectly refer to them as non shedding dogs, when actually they are low shedding dogs.

Affenpinscher
Australian Terrier
Bedlington Terrier
Bichon Frise
Black Russian Terrier
Border Terrier
Brussels Griffon
Cairn Terrier
Chinese Crested
Dandie Dinmont Terrier
Giant Schnauzer
Havanese
Irish Terrier
Kerry Blue Terrier
Komondor
Lakeland Terrier
Lowchen
Maltese
Miniature Poodle
Miniature Schnauzer
Norfolk Terrier
Norwich Terrier
Portuguese Water Dog
Puli
Sealyham Terrier
Shih Tzu
Silky Terrier

Soft Coated Wheaten Terrier
Standard Poodle
Standard Schnauzer
Tibetan Terrier
Toy Poodle
Welsh Terrier
West Highland White Terrier
Yorkshire Terrier
Airedale Terrier
Bouvier des Flandres
Irish Water Spaniel
Petit Basset Griffon Vendeen
Scottish Terrier
Wire Fox Terrier
Glen of Imaal Terrier
Lhasa Apso
Whippet
Worming Schedule for Puppies, Kittens, Cats & Dogs
Parasites don't want to kill your kitten or puppy; they just want to use them as a dinner plate! Our goal is to prevent that from happening. Intestinal parasites have been around forever and are not going away, but you can control them with the proper deworming schedule! Hookworms and roundworms are by far the most common intestinal worms found in puppies and kittens. Roundworms compete with your pet for food and hookworms live on blood causing anemia.

Rough hair coats, diarrhea, malnutrition progressing to intestinal obstruction, and anemia are common issues with worms! We want to feed our pets - not the parasites. That is why we deworm. Don't wait until you are sure your pet has parasites – they have already caused damage at this point.

Strategic Deworming Guidelines:
Strategic deworming is a practice recommended by the American Association of Veterinary Parasitologists (AAVP) and the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC).

Puppies & Kittens:
This growth phase of their life is when they are most susceptible!
Deworm at 2, 4, 6, & 8 weeks of age, then again at 12 & 16 weeks of age.
You can then move to 6 months and 1 year, then deworm as an adult.
Adult Dogs and Cats:
We are recommending the standard here. If your pet is a big hunter they will need more frequent deworming - you must assess the risk for your pet.
General Dog or Cat: Twice a year for life.
Dogs put everything in their mouth and need twice a year deworming to eliminate the parasites they will pick up. Outside cats twice a year for the same reason.
Cats that are strictly inside animals: Deworm once a year.
Cats that like to hunt: 3 times a year may be necessary.
Newly Acquired Animals:
No matter what the history or age, assume they have parasites!
Deworm immediately and repeat in 2 weeks.
Put on the above adult program.

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Music: America
By David Lanz​
You mark your stuff by putting your name on it; your dog marks his with urine. We've covered why dogs mark territory, now here's how to prevent urine-marking behaviors before they happen in your house.
Before doing anything else, take your dog to the veterinarian to rule out any medical causes for the urine-marking behavior. If he gets a clean bill of health, use the following tips to make sure he doesn't start marking his territory.

Spay (or neuter) first
Spay or neuter your dog as soon as possible. The longer a dog goes before neutering, the more difficult it will be to train him not to mark in the house. Spaying or neutering your dog should reduce urine-marking and may stop it altogether.

But if he has been marking for a long time, a pattern may already be established. Because it has become a learned behavior, spaying or neutering alone won't solve the problem. Use techniques for housetraining an adult dog to modify your dog's marking behavior.

More tips

Clean soiled areas thoroughly with a cleaner specifically designed to eliminate urine odor. Read more about removing pet odors and stains »
Make previously soiled areas inaccessible or unattractive. If this isn't possible, try to change the significance of those areas to your pet. Feed, treat, and play with your pet in the areas where he marks.
Keep objects likely to cause marking out of reach. Items such as guests' belongings and new purchases should be placed in a closet or cabinet.
Resolve conflicts between animals in your home. If you've added a new cat or new dog to your family, follow our tip sheets to help them live in harmony.
Restrict your dog's access to doors and windows so he can't observe animals outside. If this isn't possible, discourage the presence of other animals near your house.
Make friends. If your pet is marking in response to a new resident in your home (such as a roommate or spouse), have the new resident make friends with your pet by feeding, grooming, and playing with your pet. If you have a new baby, make sure good things happen to your pet when the baby is around.
Watch your dog when he is indoors for signs that he is thinking about urinating. When he begins to urinate, interrupt him with a loud noise and take him outside. If he urinates outside, praise him and give him a treat.
When you're unable to watch him, confine your dog (a crate or small room where he has never marked) or tether him to you with a leash.
Have your dog obey at least one command (such as "sit") before you give him dinner, put on his leash to go for a walk, or throw him a toy.
If your dog is marking out of anxiety, talk to your vet about medicating him with a short course of anti-anxiety medication. This will calm him down and make behavior modification more effective.
Consult an animal behaviorist for help with resolving the marking issues.
What not to do
Don't punish your pet after the fact. Punishment administered even a minute after the event is ineffective because your pet won't understand why he is being punished.

If you come home and find that your dog has urinated on all kinds of things, just clean up the mess. Don't take him over to the spots and yell and rub his nose in them. He won't associate the punishment with something he may have done hours ago, leading to confusion and possibly fear.
Urine-Marking Behavior: How to Prevent It
The Humane Society of the United States











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German Boy Dog Names
Abel
Adelmo
Ademar
Adolf
Albert
Aldo
Alvan
Ansel
Arvin
Asterix
Axel
Ballard
Bergen
Bernard
Chadrick
Claus
Conrad
Deitrich
Dustan
Edel
Emery
Emmett
Eric
Ewald
Finn
Frantz
Friedrich
Fridmund
Fritz
Genardo
Gerhard Gotzon
Guthrie
Hagan
Handel
Harbin
Hedwig
Helmer
Hernan
Herrick
Horst
Humphrey
Ibsen
Irmin
Ivo
Jaegar
Jarvis
Josef
Jupp
Kaiser
Karl
Kasper
Keifer
Klaus
Konrad
Krischan
Lambert
Lance
Leonard
Leopold
Linfred
Lothat Loudon
Ludwig
Mandel
Mathias
Mauritz
Medgar
Milco
Miles
Milo
Nando
Obert
Odolf
Odwin
Orman
Othman
Otto
Philipp
Pippin
Poldi
Rainero
Rederich
Redmond
Richart
Ritter
Rodger
Rolf
Rolland
Rory
Roth
Rudolf
Rupert Schafer
Schmuman
Seifert
Sigmund
Sigwald
Talbert
Terrelle
Tewdor
Tomas
Ulfred
Ulmo
Ulric
Ulton
Valdus
Varick
Verner
Viktor
Vilhelm
Voler
Waldo
Wallach
Walther
Weber
Welby
Wendel
Wilhelm
Wolfgang
Xildas
Yohan
Zacharias
Zigfrid
German Girl Dog Names
Ada
Adelaide
Aixa
Alarice
Alcira
Alisha
Alize
Amalie
Amelia
Amara
Annah
Arla
Arnelle
Arnulfa
Aroa
Aubrey
Babette
Benilda
Berit
Berti
Bitilda
Bova
Bruna
Calyn
Canuta
Catarina
Charleigh
Chrysta
Closinda
Delaina Delia
Duna
Edda
Elda
Elga
Elke
Elsa
Emie
Erna
Etta
Euda
Faiga
Farica
Filma
Freida
Gerda
Gerti
Giselle
Greta
Gretchen
Gretta
Hedda
Hedy
Heidi
Helda
Helga
Hetta
Ida
Idelia
Ilise Ilsa
Iselda
Jarvia
Johannah
Karla
Katrice
Katrina
Keana
Klarise
Klarissa
Lamia
Laurelei
Leona
Liesel
Lioba
Lorelei
Lottie
Lovisa
Lulu
Mallory
Mariel
Marilla
Matilda
Melia
Meryl
Mildred
Mitzi
Nan
Nixie
Odetta Orfilia
Pastora
Porscha
Radella
Raena
Rahel
Resi
Rilla
Rosilda
Rudee
Selda
Selma
Tilda
Tillie
Trudy
Ulla
Uta
Vala
Valda
Vedis
Velda
Vilma
Wanda
Wilda
Willa
Wilma
Winifred
Winola
Zelda
Zelma
Scottish Terrier Puppy and Dogs Names Ideas
Jock
Simba
Gus
Dylan
Smoky
Wolf
Ben
Felix
Gaius
Gideon
Jesse
Mickey
Rudy
Maximus
Buster
Cody
Cain
Ezra
Duke
Bobby
Murphy
Rufus
Chaos
Jett
Jinx
Bruno
Rocky
Bailey
Winston
Tucker
Teddy
Gizmo
Samson
Jagger
Scout
Max
Buddy
Toby
Josh
Jake
Sammy
Zeus
Riley
Oscar
Bandit
Pepper
Beau
Sparky
Lucky
Sam
Shadow
Rusty
Casey
Ragnor
Rogue
Sabre
Charlie
Jack
Archie
Apollo
Vulcan
Pluto
Pax
Caesar
Duke
Prince Maddy
Pepper
Sheba
Tasha
Baby
Bella
Cinders
Empress
Bobbi
Chloe
Emma
Sandy
Lily
Penny
Cleo
Sammy
Juno
Misty
Lady
Sasha
Abby
Roxy
Missy
Brandy
Coco
Annie
Siouxsie
Molly
Maggie
Daisy
Lucy
Sadie
Ginger
Precious
Bella
Angel
Leah
Mara
Persis
Phoebe
Reba
Katie
Gracie
Abby
Candy
Princess
Kishi
Rosie
Misty
Duchess
Vicki
Venus
Flora
Cassie
Dixie
Sugar
Zara
Lola
Honey
Sophie
Zoe
Charlie
Jasmine
Holly
Ruby
Sassy
Grooming your Scottish Terrier
Grooming your Miniature Schnauzer
                                                                              Tips on Stress Related Problems with Puppies

                                   ​​LIST OF THINGS ALL NEW PET OWNERS SHOULD HAVE ON HAND WHEN PUPPY ARRIVES
1.....Childrens Benedryl
Uses ...A puppy when going to a new home is under stress .A cold (cough ,runny nose ,fever at times ,sneezing ...etc) is one of the things that can easily happen because of climate change and home change ,Benedryl can be given to the puppy to help with a cold and with any allergy or itching from change of climates or dry skin they could encounter .

2....Honey or Nutri-cal ...
USES.....One thing that can happen is hypoglycemia ..a sudden drop of the sugar level can occur at any given time ,first they become tired ,then sleep and can and often do go into shock .For at least 3 to 8 or more days ,let them lick a little honey off your finger to keep the sugar up at least twice to three times a day .Nutri-cal can be purchased at your vet or at some pet supply places and does the same thing plus some vitamins .You do not need both .The honey can be used and can form a type of Bonding also since you are letting the puppy lick you .

3....Kaopectate ..
USES ...Some puppies under stress can have upset stomachs and loose bowel movements .This given according to the size of the puppy a few times a day can and does help with that problem .Peppermint also soothes the stomach.

4....Gatorade or Powerade (can use Pedialite but will not last as long after opening )...Only use the clear or the lemon lime flavors ,the others have dye in them .
USES...If a puppy under stress has loose bowel movements ,these are good to use to keep the puppy from dehydrating and can be given orally until the puppy is better .Also can be given to a healthy puppy to keep them healthy .Remember that when a puppy has loose bowels or is vomiting ,they lose nutrients they need and this needs to be replaced .These items can help to do that .Also when puppy has loose bowels or vomiting that is an automactic sugar drop,so keep the honey when you can get to it .

5....Bed for your puppy
USES ...to sleep in and rest in when needed .

6....Dry food ,puppy bite size .
Never wet the food as my puppies are weaned fully and eating on their own and do not need to have any type soft food .

7....Shampoo,brushes ,toys ,a blankie or quilt
All these things you need and more .So take a trip to your local pet toy place and stock up ...After all a new baby is a very special and should have all the love and lovely things in the world .A new best friend is for life !


Things that new puppy owners of toy dogs should be aware of .
A puppy when going to a new home is under alot of stress .You may not actually see that as in they may be playing or sleeping normal but it is there and is just waiting to take over .
Colds ,coughs ,loose bowels ,vomiting ,not eating ,eating too much ...all these and more are signs of stress .You have to watch your puppy and see if anything is wrong .
Some things you need to know ...
Do not under feed ...make sure dry food only and water is there for your puppy at all times .If a puppy does not eat when it needs to ,they can and most do become sick,sugar drops ,weakness and more can happen .If they are really overeating it means they have to have it and have not had it out for them and cannot get enough and then they get sick in a different way ...vomiting from being over full .
Make sure you have DRY FOOD OUT AT ALL TIMES WITHIN REACH OF THE PUPPY AND FRESH WATER .
Do not feed a sick puppy treats bought from a store ,can upset the stomach more and are not good for them .I use boiled chicken ,deboned (DO NOT FEED BONES TO PUPPY ,even when adult ..NO BONES !!!!!!!!!!!!!)or peanut butter rolled in bread balls or in a puppy treat bone .There are hollow treat bones that you can buy ,fill it full of peanut butter and watch them go at it ..Both are a good treat and healthy for your pet ,more than these dyed and byproducts that you buy from a pet store that can and do help to cause kidney problems,upset stomachs and other problems .
Never give a puppy a milk product ,this can and does cause loose bowels and can make them sick .
Do not feed treats to them for a meal ,to train a puppy ,you have to use more than a treat and peanut butter in a ball is better than a byproduct anyway .
keep peanut butter or chicken flavored rawhide chews for them ,never use the beef ones as it can and does have red food coloring in it and can cause kidney problems .
Make sure your pet has toys and a bed close to where it is set up as its space .
When you are away ,leave a radio or TV on for the puppy as company .Mine have 24 hour a day music from the time they arrive in the world .We play Country ,Rock and Roll ,Classical ,Blues and other everyday ,all day long in all kennels and in the house where they are raised .All my animals listen to a radio 24 hours a day every day of the year .
Never give a dog Chocolate ,that and rat poison are the two biggest killers of canines .
Start trainning your puppy to do what you want it to but never yell or stomp your feet ,a firm no is good enough for a time because you can make the puppy ill by trying to make it do more than it can under stress .
Love and attention is what a puppy needs the most for awhile and that is what you have to give ,be prepared for a new -baby - syndrom type situation .A puppy is just like having a new born baby .Love ,attention ,cuddleing ,all the things you would do for a child ,you do for a puppy .
Miniature Schnauzer
            Names​
                Cancer and the
           Scottish Terrier breed

As our understanding of the causes of cancer unfolds, it is becoming apparent that the majority of cancers are caused by environmental factors, and the minority of cancers are genetically fated to occur. Within the Scottish terrier breed; however, it would appear that genetics still plays a significant role in the development of cancer. Epidemiologic studies have shown that the Scottish terrier has a higher than expected incidence of lymphosarcoma, bladder carcinoma, oral melanoma, cancer of the skin (squamous cell carcinoma and mast cell sarcoma), and, to a lesser extent, nasal carcinoma and gastric carcinoma. Genetic susceptibility combined with environmental influences probably represent the major factors involved in cancer development in the Scottish terrier.

Scottish terrier Club of America